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20th graduates exit Interviews

01 Aug, 2017 News Center 1,344

Q.  Tell us a bit about your background.

A.  I finished undergrad in the US, majoring in political science. I co-founded a media tech company based in Silicon Valley (Sunnyvale, California) during college, worked at Twitter Korea as a head of life style & emerging talent partnerships in post-graduation, then moved to the National Assembly of Korea as a deputy chief of staff. I was also part of the team to file the Unconstitutional Appeal to guarantee people’s right to assemble at night. Later, the Constitutional Court ruled the phrase that prohibits people’s night rally unconstitutional. This clause provided the legal cornerstone to guarantee people’s rights to strike for President Park’s impeachment that mostly happened at night time.

Q.  What was your most memorable experience at KDIS?

A.  Arranging an informal discussion with the former Korea’s presidential candidate Sim, Sang Jeong as a part of KDI’s National Assembly tour. Being amazed by my fellow students’ fervent interests and in-depth knowledge on Korean politics.

At KDI, with its rich diversity of students, I was intellectually challenged and could widen my perspectives and deepen understandings on both domestic and world politics while discussing state-of-the-art global issues like Park’s impeachment, US Election result, and Brexit. Western perspectives to comprehend world politics originated in my education background, At KDI, I loved understanding the different views of Central Asia, Latin and African countries. I have substantially grown academically and culturally since I came to KDI.

Q.  How has KDIS improved your understanding as a professional in your particular field of studies?

A.  I learned from real policy-makers, KDI helped me raise my level of understanding of the past and the present of Korean politics and question my role in the future of Korea. Benefitting from KDI’s strong faculty composition, I acquired practical and relevant knowledge on policy making especially on the realm of Science and Technology Policy. I have thoroughly cultivated my skills on how to think, behave and act as a policy maker and a responsible leader.

 

Q.  Tell us a bit about your background.

A.  As a joint degree scholar between European universities and KDI, I took part in European studies in my first year. At KULeuven, Belgium we got to see what the EU does to boost sustainable development, and we figured out ways for us as individuals to help make communities prosper in a durable way, both at home and overseas. Internships in West Africa and Colombia gave me hands-on experience in how private actors work for development. Subsequently, I came to KDI to learn from Korea’s developmental success story.

Q.  What was your most memorable experience at KDIS?

A.  My most memorable experience here must have been the build-up towards the Trump election. Events like these are of global significance, as proof were the endless discussions with all the other KDI scholars. No matter what continent they were on, every single person at KDIS tried to interpret what this could mean for themselves, for their country, for the globe. I realized that a platform like KDI is unique because you only really learn through exposure to perspectives that are opposed to yours.

Q.  How has KDIS improved your understanding as a professional in your particular field of studies?

A.  The most important skill I’m taking home from KDIS is a critical assessment of expertise. The information abundance of today makes it actually hard to find the data and conclusions that are right for your question. The different research projects on development we have worked on have shown me how to identify good science, and how that translates to good policy. A critical look at the methodologies and theory someone uses makes policy making so much more efficient. I look forward to taking these newly acquired tools, single out the tough problems that development faces us with, and turn them into opportunities.

 

Q.  Tell us a bit about your background before coming to KDIS.

A.  Before attending the KDI School I have worked in the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine as a Head for Bilateral Agreement and Recognition of Education Documents Division. Among my tasks and responsibilities were coordinating the work of 6 senior specialists of the Division and coordinating two state enterprises: one responsible for recognition, of education documents, and the other responsible for invitations of the foreign students to study in Ukraine. I prepared bilateral agreements for exchange students and elaborated strategies for internationalization of higher education in Ukraine.  

Q.  What was your most memorable experience at KDIS?

A.  In KDI School I became one of many international students representing a multitude of global cultures and ways of policy making. Here I could experience firsthand how the strategy of internationalization of Korean higher education works in practice. The international environment makes KDI School special because it gives not only formal education but also the opportunity to live together and share with each other the experience of policymakers from different countries.

Q.  How has KDIS improved your understanding as a professional in your particular field of studies?

A.  By better understanding the goals of policymaking, the correct methodology of policy design, monitoring and evaluation and the real cost of the political intervention. There is a valuable baggage of knowledge which I will bring with me back home from KDI School. But besides of this, I will always keep in my heart and mind my fellows’ names and faces. I now have friends in all the corners of the world.

 

Q.  Tell us a bit about your background before coming to KDIS.

A.  Before joining KDI, I have been working as a Trade Officer in the Ministry of Industry and Trade in Malawi. I joined the civil service in 2011 when I was initially recruited as an Agribusiness Officer under the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security. In 2012 is when I was cross-transferred to the Ministry of Industry and Trade. Before joining the civil service, my professional career started at a private company, Illovo Malawi Sugar Limited, where I was employed as a Section Manager in 2009 just after graduating from my undergraduate studies the same year.

Q.  What was your most memorable experience at KDIS?

A.  My most memorable experience was participating in academic field visits by KDI School, more especially was a workshop organized by the World Bank on the outcomes of the 2017 Doing Business Index report. Having worked with the Ministry of Industry and Trade, one of my major tasks critical to the Ministry’s vision has been on creating a conducive environment for investments and therefore I have had a keen interest in the outcomes of the World Bank annual report. Being given an opportunity to participate and interact directly with the authors and co-authors of such global annual reports was thus greatly memorable.

Q.  How has KDIS improved your understanding as a professional in your particular field of studies?

A.  Studying at KDIS has helped me accumulate a wide knowledge, ideas and ongoing developments across the globe. Having being taught by very experienced intellectuals possessing great knowledge in their respective fields, am thus uniquely placed to contribute the knowledge to my country. In addition, I have had an extraordinary opportunity to interact with students and scholars from diverse professional and cultural backgrounds coming from all over the world. This type of networking coupled with the knowledge gained will be very important for integration of different ideas and perspectives pertaining to diverse global issues.


 By Valentin CROITORU (2017 MDP, Moldova)

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